#TransformationTuesday: QWERRRKOUT feat. Eva Blunt (NSFW)
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Transformation Tuesday just got a whole lot QTer…New queers featured every week! Tag us, take a pic of us and follow us on Instagram at QWERRRKOUT, and you too could be the next, featured QT! YOU BETTA QWERRRK! Oh…and don’t forget…Get yr “Gettin Piggy Wit It” merch HERE!!!

Eva Blunt

Age: 31

Location: Mexico City, Mexico

About:

“I started out as a photographer and DJ, who would also play […]

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Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire

Submitted by on Sunday, 5 April 2009No Comment

death becomes her

 

This Costume Institute exhibition explores the aesthetic development and cultural implications of mourning fashions of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Approximately thirty ensembles, many of which are being exhibited for the first time, reveal the impact of high-fashion standards on the sartorial dictates of bereavement rituals as they evolved over a century.

The thematic exhibition is organized chronologically and features mourning dress from 1815 to 1915, primarily from The Costume Institute’s collection, including mourning gowns worn by Queen Victoria and Queen Alexandra. The calendar of bereavement’s evolution and cultural implications is illuminated through women’s clothing and accessories, showing the progression of appropriate fabrics from mourning crape to corded silks, and the later introduction of color with shades of gray and mauve.

The Anna Wintour Costume Center’s Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery orients visitors to the exhibition with fashion plates, jewelry, and accessories. The main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery illustrates the evolution of mourning wear through high-fashion silhouettes. Examples of restrained simplicity are shown alongside those with ostentatious ornamentation. The predominantly black clothes are set off against a stark white background and amplified with historic photographs and daguerreotypes.

 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave at 82nd St, NYC, 212-535-7710, through February 1, 2015

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