Watch: Super Awesome NYC DJ Honey Dijon Reenvisions Sylvester Disco Classic “Stars” for Smirnoff Campaign
Mon, 11/12/17 – 19:17 | No Comment

NYC-based DJ/producer Honey Dijon has garnered a HUGE, international following…from giggin’ at Panorama Bar in Berlin, Sub Club in Glasgow, The Block in Tel Aviv, Space in Ibiza, and back to Output in NYC. Her latest big move is a re-working of Disco classic Stars by Sylvester, a track she produced for Smirnoff’s We Are Open campaign, […]

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Happy Birthday 2 Ya “Ralph Bunche” First African American Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Submitted by on Monday, 7 August 2017No Comment

Ralph Bunche, born August 7, 1903 or 1904, was a political scientist, academic, and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Israel. He was the first African American to be so honored in the history of the prize. He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President John F. Kennedy.

One of Bunche’s major achievements was his efforts from 1947 to 1949 to bring peace to the region of Palestine, the site of major conflict between Arab and Israeli forces. After his supervisor was killed in a terrorist attack, Bunche was called upon to helm the talks on the island of Rhodes. The long negotiation process was defined by the diplomat’s willingness to meet with both sides and be meticulous, calm and patient about getting parties to sit with each other and get used to signing off on smaller matters.

The Armistice Agreements were signed in 1949. Bunche won the Nobel Peace Prize the following year, becoming the first African American and person of color in the world to receive the award.

Toward the end of the 1950s he had become U.N. under-secretary-general for special political affairs and had overseen the dispatch of thousands of non-fighting, neutral troops in the 1956 Suez conflict. Bunche cited this effort as “the single most satisfying work” he’d ever done, as military forces were being used to maintain peace and not aid war.

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