#TransformationTuesday: QWERRRKOUT feat. Eva Blunt (NSFW)
Tue, 17/09/19 – 15:11 | No Comment

Transformation Tuesday just got a whole lot QTer…New queers featured every week! Tag us, take a pic of us and follow us on Instagram at QWERRRKOUT, and you too could be the next, featured QT! YOU BETTA QWERRRK! Oh…and don’t forget…Get yr “Gettin Piggy Wit It” merch HERE!!!

Eva Blunt

Age: 31

Location: Mexico City, Mexico

About:

“I started out as a photographer and DJ, who would also play […]

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Happy Birthday 2 Ya “Ida B. Wells” Feminist, Suffragist & NAACP Founder

Submitted by on Sunday, 16 July 2017No Comment

Ida B. Wells, born July 16, 1862,  was a journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, feminist, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

On May 4, 1884, a train conductor with the Memphis and Charleston Railroad ordered Wells to give up her seat in the first-class ladies car and move to the smoking car.Wells refused to give up her seat. The conductor and two men dragged Wells out of the car. When she returned to Memphis, she hired an African-American attorney to sue the railroad. She lost the case. This injustice led Wells to pick up a pen to write about issues of race and politics in the South. Using the moniker “Iola,” a number of her articles were published in black newspapers and periodicals. Wells eventually became an owner of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight, and, later, of the Free Speech.

In 1896, she formed the National Association of Colored Women,  that would later become known as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Though she is considered a founding member of the NAACP, Wells later cut ties with the organization, stating that she felt the organization, in its infancy at the time she left, had lacked action-based initiatives.

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